Nosebleed

Is this your child's symptom?

  • Bleeding from 1 or both nostrils
  • Not caused by an injury

If NOT, try one of these:


Causes of Nosebleeds

Nosebleeds are common because of the rich blood supply of the nose. Common causes include:

  • Spontaneous Nosebleed. Most nosebleeds start up without a known cause.
  • Rubbing. Rubbing or picking the nose is the most common known cause. It's hard to not touch or rub the nose.
  • Blowing. Blowing the nose too hard can cause a nose bleed.
  • Suctioning. Suctioning the nose can sometimes cause bleeding. This can happen if the suction tip is put in too far.
  • Sinus Infections. The main symptoms are lots of dry snot and a blocked nose. This leads to extra nose blowing and picking. The sinus infection is more often viral than bacterial.
  • Nose Allergies. The main symptom is a very itchy nose. This leads to extra rubbing and blowing.
  • Dry Air. Dryness of the nasal lining makes it more likely to bleed. In the winter, forced air heating often can dry out the nose.
  • Allergy Medicines. These help the nasal symptoms, but also dry out the nose.
  • Ibuprofen and Aspirin. These medicines increase the bleeding tendency. Aspirin is not used in children.
  • Bleeding Disorder (Serious). This means the blood platelets or clotting factors are missing or not working right. A bleeding disorder should be suspected if the nosebleed can't be stopped. Excessive bleeding from the gums or with minor cuts is also a clue. Bleeding disorders are a rare cause of frequent nosebleeds.

When to Call for Nosebleed

When to Call for Nosebleed

Call 911 Now

  • Passed out (fainted) or too weak to stand
  • You think your child has a life-threatening emergency

Call Doctor or Seek Care Now

  • Nosebleed that won't stop after 10 minutes of squeezing the nose correctly
  • Large amount of blood has been lost
  • New skin bruises or bleeding gums not caused by an injury also present
  • High-risk child (such as with low platelets or other bleeding disorder)
  • You think your child needs to be seen, and the problem is urgent

Call Doctor Within 24 Hours

  • You think your child needs to be seen, but the problem is not urgent

Call Doctor During Office Hours

  • Age less than 1 year old
  • New onset nosebleeds happen 3 or more times in a week
  • Hard-to-stop nosebleeds are a frequent problem
  • Easy bleeding is present in other family members
  • You have other questions or concerns

Self Care at Home

  • Mild nosebleed

Call 911 Now

  • Passed out (fainted) or too weak to stand
  • You think your child has a life-threatening emergency

Call Doctor or Seek Care Now

  • Nosebleed that won't stop after 10 minutes of squeezing the nose correctly
  • Large amount of blood has been lost
  • New skin bruises or bleeding gums not caused by an injury also present
  • High-risk child (such as with low platelets or other bleeding disorder)
  • You think your child needs to be seen, and the problem is urgent

Call Doctor Within 24 Hours

  • You think your child needs to be seen, but the problem is not urgent

Call Doctor During Office Hours

  • Age less than 1 year old
  • New onset nosebleeds happen 3 or more times in a week
  • Hard-to-stop nosebleeds are a frequent problem
  • Easy bleeding is present in other family members
  • You have other questions or concerns

Self Care at Home

  • Mild nosebleed

Care Advice for Nosebleed

  1. What You Should Know About Nosebleeds:
    • Nosebleeds are common.
    • You should be able to stop the bleeding if you use the correct technique.
    • Here is some care advice that should help.
  2. Squeeze the Lower Nose:
    • Gently squeeze the soft parts of the lower nose together. Gently press them against the center wall for 10 minutes. This puts constant pressure on the bleeding point.
    • Use the thumb and index finger in a pinching manner.
    • If the bleeding continues, move your point of pressure.
    • Have your child sit up and breathe through the mouth during this procedure.
    • If rebleeds, use the same technique again.
  3. Put Gauze into the Nose:
    • If pressure alone fails, use a piece of gauze. Wet it with a few drops of water. Another option is to put a little petroleum jelly (such as Vaseline) on it.
    • Insert the wet gauze into the side that is bleeding. Press again for 10 minutes. Reason it works: the gauze puts more pressure on the bleeding spot.
    • Special nose drops: if your child has lots of nose bleeds, buy some decongestant nose drops. An example is Afrin. No prescription is needed. Put 3 drops on the gauze and press. The nose drops also shrink the blood vessels in the nose.
    • Caution: don't use decongestant nose drops if your child is under 1 year of age.
    • If you don't have gauze, use a piece of paper towel.
    • Repeat the process of gently squeezing the lower soft parts of the nose. Do this for 10 minutes.
  4. Prevent Recurrent Nosebleeds:
    • If the air in your home is dry, use a humidifier to keep the nose from drying out.
    • For nose blowing, blow gently.
    • For nose suctioning, don't put the suction tip very far inside. Also, move it gently.
    • Do not use aspirin and ibuprofen. Reason: Increases bleeding tendency.
    • Bleeding areas in the front of the nose sometimes develop a scab. It may heal slowly and re-bleed. If that happens to your child, try this tip. Apply a small amount of petroleum jelly (Vaseline) to the spot. Repeat twice a day. Do not use for more than 1 week.
  5. What to Expect:
    • Over 99% of nosebleeds will stop if you press on the right spot.
    • It may take 10 minutes of direct pressure.
    • After swallowing blood from a nosebleed, your child may vomit a little blood.
    • Your child may also pass a dark stool tomorrow from swallowed blood.
  6. Call Your Doctor If:
    • Can't stop bleeding with 10 minutes of direct pressure done correctly
    • You think your child needs to be seen
    • Your child becomes worse

And remember, contact your doctor if your child develops any of the 'Call Your Doctor' symptoms.

Disclaimer: this health information is for educational purposes only. You, the reader, assume full responsibility for how you choose to use it.

Copyright 2000-2019 Schmitt Pediatric Guidelines LLC.

First Aid - Nosebleed
  • Sit up and lean forward. This will keep the blood from running down the back of the throat.
  • Apply Pressure. Gently squeeze the lower soft parts of the nose against the center wall for 10-15 minutes. Use your thumb and your index finger in a pinching manner.
  • If the bleeding continues, move your point of pressure and repeat again for another 10-15 minutes.

Special Notes: The goal is to apply continuous pressure to the bleeding point inside the nose.


Denver Pediatrics

What Our Patients Say:

I absolutely love this office, and everyone, from the doctors, nurses, and medial assistants to the entire front and back office teams, is exceptional and incredibly caring. We also happen to live in the Stapleton area, but I feel so lucky to have such an excellent pediatric office so close. I haven’t seen every provider, but we have had several and we love them all. Now not every provider is going to be a good fit for every family, but that’s what great - this practice has a variety of personalities. However, I have found all of them to be extremely knowledgeable, personable, caring and patient - I know our PCP is superb and I refer this practice all the time. Additionally, I have called their triage line several times and have received excellent advice. They also provide forms and fill prescription refills in a timely manner. Additionally, their office hours are good, and I believe during the winter months, then tend to provide a Saturday clinic, which is awesome. Overall, unless we move, we are staying with Stapleton Pediatrics. My only hope is that the practice grows. Katie Jan 15,2015

Stapleton Office

2975 Roslyn Street
Suite 100
Denver, CO 80238

303-399-7900
FAX: 303-399-7999

MONDAY-FRIDAY: 8am to 5pm
SATURDAY: 8am to 12:30pm

  • Sick Visits only on Saturdays
  • Our Denver pediatrics office is closed every day from 12:30-1:30 for lunch
  • We are closed on major holidays
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Pearl Street Office

1258 South Pearl Street
Suite 110
Denver, CO 80210

303-399-7970
FAX: 303-399-7905

MONDAY-FRIDAY: 8am to 5pm 
SATURDAY: Closed

  • Saturday sick appts seen at Stapleton Pediatrics office only
  • Our office is closed every day from 12:30-1:30 for lunch
  • We are closed on major holidays
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